Interview with Vladimír Ambruz, Registered European Lawyer and Solicitor, co-founder of the AAP. This interview consists of answers to questions from the AAP member´s questionaire.                                                                                   

1. Are you a sole practitioner?

I am a sole practitioner. I am registered with both the SRA and the CBA.

2. Where are you located geographically?

I practice in Prague, and my clients are mostly from Prague or from the Central Bohemian Region with some from the Pardubicky Region. I also provide my services internationally.

3. What four areas of law do you focus on?

  • Business law with international aspects
  • European law
  • Trusts
  • Intellectual property law

4. How did you qualify as both Czech and English lawyer?

I took the full route to qualification in the United Kingdom, my education is as follows:

  • Bachelor degrees: University of Wales, BPP in London, the University of Sydney
  • Masters degrees: LL.M., University College of London (UCL)
  • Vocational degrees: Legal Practice Course (LPC) at the University of Law in London
  • Further qualifications: LL.M. at the University of Law in London, I am currently enrolled at the University of England to qualify as a solicitor of New South Wales (Australia)

I worked in several law firms in the Czech Republic and I am fully qualified to provide legal services in Czech law as a registered European lawyer.

5. Who is your typical client?

I prefer clients seeking a lawyer for long-term cooperation. Such cooperation is most effective, because it allows the lawyer to understand the overall needs of his client better and the way he or she does business. It is the only way to be able to provde truly tailor-made legal services.

6. What is it that you love most about practicing law?

I am mostly interested in Trusts and their operation within both legal systems – both practically from the legal standpoint as well as theoretically from the academical standpoint. In the Czech Republic, it is a relatively new legal phenomenon. I was fortunate enough to study trusts in the United Kingdom where trusts have centuries old tradition.